Beatrice Cofield - The Critique

Beatrice Cofield plunges into an oceanic space, where there seems to be an immediate hypersonic feel in this otherworldly sphere. The brush strokes are strong and luminous, the power of these movements and lines stimulate and give life to the bodies in the artworks, establishing an energetic swirl of unexpected shades. 

The electric blue hues have a powerful role in her paintings, in which its buoyancy jolts the entire composition. Through Cofield’s expertise, the colours synchronously blend or clash; this synthesis provokes a strong emotive fluidity, and enhances the visceral movement and passion that the figures embrace. Albeit the apparent blurred narrative, Cofield climaxes her inspiration and passion so spontaneously that she commutes her paintings into a complete epic narrative made of human feeling. 
 
In fact, at a deeper glance, we are catapulted in an enthralling tangle of flows that transform Cofield’s paintings into visual harmonic poetry. Looking intently at each gesture, her works seem to perceive a musical melody that accompanies the viewer into a oneiric world. In addition, Cofield’s works recall the magnetic appeal of the Italian Futurist Movement, drawing inspiration from the definite celebration of a modern dynamism. In fact, she depicts a magic flow of bodies and atmospheres through which each figure represented is having a dancing metamorphosis in honour of the charmed viewer. 
 
As in Wassily Kandinsky’s abstract works, Cofield communicates through expressive coloured areas that transcend representations of the ephemeral world, conveying the inner feelings of the soul. In Cofield’s compositions some silhouettes and shapes are discernible, while other touches are more discreet and veiled; they reveal themselves only progressively to those who deepen their connection with her works. 
 
The artist harmonises and enriches her creations stroke by stroke until she intends each form to resonate with the observer’s soul. 
 
Timothy Warrington
International Confederation of Art Critics