Artist Amal Barwell

The Critique







 

Amal Barwell is a wonderfully energising talent whose passion and strength radiate conspicuously from her artworks. Barwell’s creative inspiration seems to be rooted in Expressionism and specifically influenced by the pre and post war New York School of Abstract and Figurative Expressionism. Barwell is an evocative painter capable of the highest form of artistic communication that penetrates the soul and subconscious mind.


Her portraits have an impressive and compelling communicative impetus that capture the viewer, and magnetise his entire emotional and cultural experience. Her lines define, enclose, caress or just flow through and around her figures with a sensuality that extenuates all the underlying intensity of her puissant instincts, reminding us of Elaine De Kooning or Edwin Dickinson.


Amal has an extraordinary taste for colour. She balances the hues in a tonal crescendo that give her canvases an elegant and eloquent dramatic impact. We are fascinated and immediately drawn into her visual imagery, and we experience the full depth of the artist’s soul through her incredible artistry.


Her landscapes are essential and post-minimalistic. They are purely abstract and evoke a sensation of sublime states of being. Our view is restricted and simplified as if to present us with only the essence of the scenes, with all unnecessary detail eliminated, and composed in a linear pattern of layers of colour in order to enhance our sensorial perception  to the utmost, carrying forward the idealistic and factual heritage of Milton Avery.  


Amal’s more abstract paintings are wonderful expressions of her innermost meditative personality. Strong, primitively passionate feelings depicted with an almost monochromatic palette, obsessively surging through the repetition of horizontal lines and layers. Reminiscent of Mark Rothko and Franz Kline.


The capability to connect so forcefully with her  subconscious impulses, and reproduce them on canvas, is the sign of unquestionable talent. As Kline himself said: “The nature of anguish is translated into different forms”, and Amal seems to know exactly how to embody this statement to perfection.

 

 

Christopher Rosewood